Thursday, September 20, 2012

iVote

This is a call to all of you who claim US citizenship. We all have responsibilities to each other (I’ve said this before). You have no choice about that as a human being living in society. Your responsibility as a US citizen is to vote for your government. That’s how the system (supposedly) works. Even if the system doesn’t work, there’s no hope it can possibly work correctly if you don’t do your part. Instead of a tyrannical dictator controlling everything according to his or her whim, or a messy mass of people fighting over the tiniest detail, we send representatives to the federal government to do the (really) dirty work for us. The key word here is representative – the people in government represent the wider population (or they’re supposed to) so we don’t end up with the tyrant or the messy mass. Your government does not represent you if you do not vote (and if you don’t vote, you have no right to complain about the results because you didn’t participate). Voting is the simplest, easiest, and most basic way to participate in politics (and the rest of it gets so nasty Id’ rather not get any further into politics beyond voting). We tend to take voting for granted because it is a right that is given freely in the US. Recent generations have not had to fight or struggle to gain access to the polls so they can voice their opinions and concerns. We’re incredibly lucky that we have been handed the opportunity to tell our government what we do and don’t like, and who we would like to see making the big decisions. The problem is that we’ve become complacent and take this right for granted, so much so that we see it as optional, instead of taking full advantage of the opportunity to influence the direction of our communities, states, and country. You have power; you just have to use it. Go vote, if for no other reason than I told you that you have to.

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